All Pro-One Performance CNC Machine Shop Being Auctioned Off

The board of directors of Pro-One Performace has decided to auction off what seems to be their entire modern machine shop equipment. It includes CNC machine centers, CNC turning centers, Vertical mills, Lathes, Horizontal and Vertical bands saws, welding and polishing equipment, etc. The auction will happen July 30 at 10.30 AM at Pro-One Performance Inc. headquarters 2700 Melbourne Avenue, Pomona, CA. It is conducted by Tauber-Arons, an industrial auctioneers & Liquidators. In addition Pro-One is looking for a corporation to lease their 18,500 sq. ft. facility where their machine shop was sitting.

July 15, 12.50 PM EST: Ron at Pro-One sent me this complement of information: ” Pro-One’s not closing down, just scaling back like most big companies are right now.  They are just getting out of the machine shop business as it’s not profitable.  They have (for years) used other machine shops to handle excess work and will expand the use of local outside shops instead of making everything in-house.  They will continue to do prototype work and R and D at the Pro-One facility”.
       

Zipper's

31 Responses to “All Pro-One Performance CNC Machine Shop Being Auctioned Off”


  1. 1 Chris Callen - Source Editor Jul 15th, 2008 at 1:20 am

    What does this mean? Anyone from Pro-one on this blog?

  2. 2 Dave B. Jul 15th, 2008 at 3:52 am

    I wonder if this is a scale-down, or a sign of something worse?

  3. 3 Henry Schneider Jul 15th, 2008 at 6:39 am

    Doesn’t look good. If Pro-One gets rid of all its machines, it means they can’t produce parts (motorcycles and cars). Since I don’t see Pro-One becoming a distributor of others parts, there are 2 options. 1- They will order production of their designs in China, or 2- They are liquidating (next the stock of parts) and will close very soon. Pro-One should talk and state their intentions here in this blog.. In both cases, it’s bad news. Thanks Cyril for always being the 1st to get the news, good or bad..

  4. 4 Greg Jul 15th, 2008 at 6:44 am

    No machine, no part, no business, no money, no pro-one anymore. RIP. I wish I could be wrong.

  5. 5 Rod Christian Jul 15th, 2008 at 6:48 am

    I bet all these expensive CNC machines were on several loans/leases. Auction instructed by the bank(s)? Beginning of the end.

  6. 6 Gar Jul 15th, 2008 at 10:14 am

    The Fat Lady seems to be warming up —— Will the last person out please turn out the lights ?

  7. 7 Tyler Jul 15th, 2008 at 10:55 am

    Chris, i am certain pro-one reads Cyril. If they don’t reply, we know what it means. Sad.

  8. 8 RoadSter Jul 15th, 2008 at 11:17 am

    This doesn’t look too good. It’s never a good sign when you start selling your machines.
    There is no way they can start manufacturing in China and be able to get stuff in stock at all time.
    Wouldn’t be surprised if they would go away. Sad.

  9. 9 Burt Doria Jul 15th, 2008 at 11:22 am

    Another one about to bite the dust. BTW, Pro-One also made a business selling some copied parts.

  10. 10 Andy Ferrell Jul 15th, 2008 at 11:24 am

    Cyril, who is next? I’m sure you know. Tell us.

  11. 11 Westside Willie Jul 15th, 2008 at 12:00 pm

    That is really sad. “By order of the board of directors,” the brochure says and Cyril points out. That seems to say it all. They made what looked like quality parts. A real loss.

  12. 12 Ron Jul 15th, 2008 at 12:43 pm

    Pro-One’s not closing down, just scaling back like most big companies are right now. They are just getting out of the machine shop business as it’s not profitable. They have (for years) used other machine shops to handle excess work and will expand the use of local outside shops instead of making everything in-house. They will continue to do prototype work and R&D at the Pro-One facility.

  13. 13 Chris Callen - Source Editor Jul 15th, 2008 at 12:52 pm

    Will their mission statement still be “Quality controlled components made in the U.S.A.” I don’t see that on their site anymore, is this a sign of another American company that has a plan to outsource?

  14. 14 Gar Jul 15th, 2008 at 1:50 pm

    The statement from Ron, AKA: Pro-One, is virtually the same exact statement that American Ironhorse used and we all know how that turned out.

  15. 15 Ron Jul 15th, 2008 at 2:21 pm

    Chris,
    Everything we where making in our machine shop will still be made in USA at local shops.

    As to American Iron Horse, they fell victim to the same thing that hurt all the BIG bike builders in the US. When demand for the bikes dried up, they could not support their huge operations. We will still be building our line of bikes which we target mainly to Canada and Australia where sales are still pretty good. US bike sales are terrible so we don’t focus much on that market.

    Also, one big thing that also helps Pro-One is they own their own building.

    Ron

  16. 16 RoadSter Jul 15th, 2008 at 3:33 pm

    It’s good to hear… They make good products.

  17. 17 Westside Willie Jul 15th, 2008 at 7:02 pm

    Glad to hear they will still be around.

  18. 18 Sheridan Jul 15th, 2008 at 9:31 pm

    I’ve seen plenty of your bikes down here in Western Australia Ron and they look fantastic. I hope the decision to export bikes internationally pays dividends, as I personally see this as a key part to companies like yours surviving down turn in the US market and upcoming recession.

  19. 19 Nicker Jul 16th, 2008 at 2:13 am

    Ron,

    Thanks for a quick, concise response. It’s important for all of us to guard against the negativity that can be generated by the rumor mill, which can exacerbate any market down turn.

    A good business man knows how to scale his operation with the market. If, the overhead required to maintain a large production facility isn’t appropriate, then so outsourcing is a reasonable and viable alternative.

    Glad to hear you’ll stay “in the game.”

    Provided your quality specifications remain the same, your customers shouldn’t expect the new production strategy to alter your work flow any more than the normal increase in lead time out-sourced suppliers introduces into any product-realization process.

    More to the point, this announcement should simply be a reminder to your customers to plan the timing of their purchases with some extra lead time in mind.

    It’s a time for positive planning, as opposed to fear mongering.

    IMHO, anyway….
    -nicker-.

  20. 20 Ron Jul 16th, 2008 at 10:30 am

    Well said Nicker. The biggest change is we won’t be cutting the raw billet parts here; that’s what will be sent to local shops, many of which we’ve used for over 10 years anyway to handle overflow work. We still have to polish the parts and send them to local chrome shops and then assemble and package the parts, so that aspect will not change. We will continue to cut our wheels, pulley’s and rotors in-house. We’re keeping several CNC machines for that type of work.

  21. 21 Shawn1340 Jul 16th, 2008 at 11:02 am

    I’m glad to hear that you aren’t outsourcing to China!!

  22. 22 Gar Jul 17th, 2008 at 2:39 pm

    Yet!!!!!

  23. 23 Chux Jul 21st, 2008 at 1:50 pm

    After looking at the list of items being auctioned off, It truly looks like a liquidation to the walls.
    If they are statying in the wheel business, why get rid of “Wheel” specific ploishing machines. Office Furniture and Equip…. 18,000 sf Building for lease???

    Come on, let’s call it what it is…..

  24. 24 Lee Wimmer Jul 22nd, 2008 at 4:33 pm

    This comes as no surprise to me. It is extremly hard to manufacture anything in the country. Unfortunatly our wonderful government leaders don’t seem to give a shit about just what made our great country GREAT. manufacturing for one damn thing. And now it’s all going away. I just want to make one point here. I get this all the time with our stuff. gee its a great product but so damn expensive. Yeah well that is what it takes to be made in the USA. I for one still believe in MADE in AMERICA. Which is why Wimmer Custom Cycle remains true to being made here with USA workers. So just remember that………long after the thrillof the cheap price is gone. Quality lasts forever. And so does our pride!!
    Lee Wimmer , Pres. Wimmer Custom Cycle

  25. 25 jspfc Jul 22nd, 2008 at 7:07 pm

    I strongly disagree Mr. Wimmer. Just because something is made in the US doesn’t mean that it should be ridiculously priced and it doesn’t mean it is better quality.(I think Japan showed us that in the 80’s.)

    The price of a product inherently comes down to a few fixed things: cost of materials, cost of machines, cost of the operation, cost of labor and profit.

    In my opinion the reason anything made in the US is priced so high is because either the labor wants too much or the owner is too greedy.

    People in this country feel that they are owed something. That the “American Dream” is something that is guaranteed to them. Well, I think everyone is learning through this economic downturn that it is not something that is guaranteed. If people want jobs to quit being shipped out of the country, then Americans need to learn that not everyone can be a millionaire or own their own company(and owning your own company doesnt mean you will be a millionaire). Someone has to work in the factories and the fields and they typically will not be able to buy the house with the white picket fence and a flat screen television.

    Until that time comes, we will continue to see jobs outsourced because there are people out there in the world who seem to be hungrier than we are and they still know how to work hard for a living, even if it means they aren’t making $15 or $20/hr. Hell they are happy to have any money.

    Sorry but I am not sure why made in America = higher prices. Hell with the cost of transportation, an American company should be able to compete with anyone who ships a product here from half way around the world. Not to mention the dollar is so weak they have to charge more to make the same they thought they would a year ago.

    Reality check America, factory workers, laborers, mechanics, etc. shouldn’t live in a mansion, drive a $40k Chevy or Ford truck, have a boat, motorcycle, etc. and if you think you should, well that is the problem.

  26. 26 Lee Wimmer Jul 22nd, 2008 at 8:38 pm

    this is a reply to you jspfc
    Obviously you do NOT own a manufacturing company by your reply. I’m not going to go into ALL that is involved , but it’s a little more complicated than you think!
    You forgot to factor things in like TAXES, cost of insurance , workmans comp ( which by the way has a very high rate in machine shops) cost of marketing, employee benifits., the EPA ,Just to mention a few. And by the way would you be happy to work in MY factory for 5 or 6 dollars and hour. That is even more than the people get in China. No sir we are not all millionares just because we have factories here in the USA and we are all greedy. Again I personaly think you are pretty clueless. But that is what makes this country great. You are entitled to your opinion. Right or wrong. And if I happen to live well because of my buisness, well I think after 30 plus years of taking chances, paying for all my employees mistakes, being in debt on equipment, dealing with customers that don’t pay you. And providing a good living to my employees……….well sir I believe I earned it. And again living in this great country everybody has the same opertunity that I did . Start your own biz and then come back and talk to me.

  27. 27 Nicker Jul 22nd, 2008 at 10:08 pm

    Lee,

    RE:
    “…. after 30 plus years of taking chances, paying for all my employees mistakes, being in debt on equipment, dealing with customers that don’t pay you. And providing a good living to my employees……….well sir I believe I earned it. And again living in this great country everybody has the same opertunity that I did . Start your own biz and then come back and talk to me…”

    Spot on Dude…!!!!

    And “clueless” doesn’t near do him justice.

    -nicker-

  28. 28 jspfc Jul 22nd, 2008 at 10:42 pm

    Wimmer

    I understand there are other factors involved in any business but the majority of them are the ones I stated and I can admit that I missed the cost of insurance, but taxes are taxes and they will always be there.

    And if I brought nothing to a company but a warm body who could sometimes follow directions and might show up then, yes I would be happy to have a job and work for $5/hr. And if I got my act together then I would work hard and learn at the $5/hr job and work my way up, not expect to have it handed to me which is what most people in this country expect.

    And if you have done well then congratulations. I know owning a business is hard, stressful, very risky because there are no guarantees. But there are also benefits to go along with it so please don’t wine about the hard parts and most companies, and I say most not all, would rather cut a job then cut profit.

    And if I am clueless then why is our nation in the predicament we are in? It is because people tried to buy things they couldn’t afford, houses, cars, motorcycles, boats, RV’s, etc. Then when it went south, the people want to blame it on someone else and have the government bail them out. And to be honest with you, most of what I said probably wasn’t aimed at you, it was aimed at the 20 and 30 somethings who have had everything handed to them so far in life.

    But the part that I do truly believe is that, “gee its a great product but so damn expensive. Yeah well that is what it takes to be made in the USA.” is bull. I am not saying it is solely because of the owner, actually if you read what I said it is more on the workers.

    And Nicker, if you have a different opinion why dont you state it. Why are our jobs leaving the country and the economy in the dumps?

  29. 29 Nicker Jul 22nd, 2008 at 11:17 pm

    Wimm-

    RE:
    “… I understand there are other factors involved in any business but…”
    “… owning a business is hard, stressful, very risky because there are no guarantees. But …”

    But, What…???

    RE:
    “…And if I got my act together…”

    Well, then you would realize there isn’t a “but”.

    Apparently you want some type of kinder

    RE:
    “… Why is our nation in the predicament we are in?….”

    Are you kidding me….???!!!!

    How about Politicians who can’t stop throwing away money on “bridges to nowhere.”
    How about an electorate who vote for “entitlements” paid for by “others.”
    How about emerging generations who know less and less, but expect more and more.
    How about the Progressive educators who have been teaching Socialism in our schools.
    How about all those who would go for Globalism over Nationalism.
    How about only three Presidents since the 1920’s understood that ya can’t tax your way out of a recession.
    ETC. ETC. ETC…….

    I don’t know what ya want from me…..
    But stay out-a my wallet and don’t tell me how to run my life.

    -nicker-

  30. 30 Nicker Jul 22nd, 2008 at 11:21 pm

    Ooops,

    Left out:

    …. kinder gentler society. Well, this is about as good as it gets….

    (sorry about the omission)

    -nicker-

  31. 31 Vern Oct 3rd, 2008 at 7:10 pm

    Outsourcing and selling off machinery is actually a really good idea right now. If they hadn’t done so before, they probably would have been forced to in the recent past. In any case, running a lean shop is the best thing an owner can do in the current market, and I’m sure his outsources appreciate the opportunity to be useful as well. If they end up doing great business in the future, there’s no reason they couldn’t expand past their former glory either, so that’s a silver lining.

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