Weld-On Hardtail Section For Harley-Davidson Shovelhead

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Owning a genuine Harley-Davidson Shovelhead? Want to turn it into a hardtail ride? You best, meaning easiest and fastest move is to use a pre-made weld-on complete hardtail section. This one is fabricated out of DOM 1 1/8″ tubing (seat section is 1″) with all the parts 100% tig welded. It is equipped with a helm joint axle block and comes with a 3/4″ rear axle and chain tensioner. If you are not an expert at welding, please ask for a professional to weld it to your Shovelhead frame. Retail price: $499 + $35 shipping in continental US. Available at Black Sunshine Customs or call Brian on my behalf: 217-433-8745

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17 Responses to “Weld-On Hardtail Section For Harley-Davidson Shovelhead”


  1. 1 Ronnie Jun 10th, 2009 at 7:26 pm

    90%of the work done. That’s good.

  2. 2 Triumph Jun 10th, 2009 at 7:36 pm

    You want it done right, you go to Fabricator Kevin.

  3. 3 dick Jun 10th, 2009 at 10:03 pm

    i have seen some of this guys stuff in person. I wouldn’t put my life in his hands. ask him if he is insured before you place the order!!

  4. 4 jatinder pal Jun 11th, 2009 at 12:20 am

    the part looks good….

  5. 5 Sheridan Jun 11th, 2009 at 2:24 am

    Paughco and Santee have been making them since the dawn of time haven’t they?

  6. 6 Black Shadow Jun 11th, 2009 at 7:46 am

    I have always wondered what keeps the heim joints aligned in these applications. Anyone know?

  7. 7 Lyle Jun 11th, 2009 at 3:58 pm

    Or why you need a heim joint, which are normally used when there’s some potential misalignment due to a part going through some motion. Or what the shear stress on the heim joint bolt is? This is traditionally handled on a rigid frame by the axle plates. One thing’s for sure, it’s different than the rest of the weld on rear sections.

  8. 8 Chopper Kid Jun 11th, 2009 at 8:09 pm

    The section does look good but I do like the Fab Kevin way more, from the stock looking tubing bent instead of the hoop and the forged axle plates and everything he does is top notch.
    As far as the as stated above “heim joints” don’t you need 2 rod ends to call it that? Aren’t they just sperical rod ends.? They have been used in race car applications for quite along time mostly in suspension stuff like 4-links, ladder bars, wishbones, track locaters, front a-arms,etc etc.
    Cole Foster had that style of frame on the ultra cool blue bike he built.
    Look wise I can see how it seems sketchy being that we are all used to looking at huge plates but it is really up to a engineer to crunch the numbers. They have a really high shear strength value but there are different grades from mild steel to 4130 chromemoly.
    They aren’t very expensive, maybe just replace them every year or so since moly work hardens and gets brittle. Any thoughts?

  9. 9 nicker Jun 12th, 2009 at 12:35 am

    RE:
    “…I have always wondered what keeps the heim joints aligned in these applications. Anyone know?…”

    Designed for omnidirectional movement, they are constrained by tension or compression.
    Otherwise allowed to rotate freely.

    So that begs the question, why would ya want your rear wheel axle to have that freedom of motion?

    Triumph tried something of the sort with their “Sprung Hub”…. Not a good idea.

    Most of the early plunger suspensions suffered from the same rear wheel movement to some degree or another.

    -nicker-

  10. 10 Chopper Kid Jun 12th, 2009 at 10:18 pm

    Nicker

    There can not be any movement because the sperical bearings are on different radiuses and the axle goes through both rod ends. The rod ends have the same style bearings that are used in the pivot bolt of a softail swingarm.
    It is a easy inexpensive way to mount the rear axle.

  11. 11 nicker Jun 13th, 2009 at 12:21 am

    Chopper K.

    As pictured, the adjusters looked like heim joints to me (and apparently to others).
    Having tried that solution on a swing arm pivot/chain-adjuster combination, although a cool look, performance was disappointing at best. The thing handled like a hook & Ladder truck with the rear driver missing.

    But “speical bearings” …..? Well, that may be a different story altogether.

    Sorry about the confusion.

    -nicker-

  12. 12 Lyle Jun 14th, 2009 at 10:28 pm

    The text states they are Heim Joints. I wouldn’t trust them cantilevered to the rear like they are while handling the shear and bending moments caused by the bikes dead load and the dynamic live loads while riding. But that’s just my opinion. Are the adjuster bolts threaded all the way to the heim joint causing a stress concentration? Looks like they are.

  13. 13 "D" Jun 17th, 2009 at 10:19 am

    HEY DICK! I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW WHERE YOU HAVE SEEN HIS WORK AT. BECAUSE I HAVE SEEN MANY OF HIS PARTS AND COMPLETE BIKES,AND HAVE RIDDEN A FEW OF THEM MYSELF WITH NO FEAR OF ANY PROBLEMS. I ALSO KNOW MANY OTHERS WHO RIDE HIS BIKES WITH PRIDE.SO I THINK THAT YOU HAVE NEVER ACTUALLY SEEN HIS WORK IN PERSON,OR YOU DONT KNOW WHAT QUALITY WORK LOOKS LIKE,OR YOUR JUST STRAIGHT UP JELOUS OF HIS WORK! AND AS FAR AS THE HEIM JOINTS GO THEY ARE CHROMEMOLY AND SCREWED ALL THE WAY IN AND THE AXLE KEEPS THEM PARALLEL TO EACH OTHER SO THERE IS NO MOVEMENT. IN FACT THE STOCK HARLEY AXLE WILL BREAK LONG BEFORE THE HEIMS GIVE OUT.

  14. 14 Brian Jun 17th, 2009 at 10:42 am

    Thanks ” D “. You are correct on the Heim Joint. There is a separate sprocket for the chain adjuster though. I dont usally reply to any of the comment. Everybody has there opinion. Im glad to see someone else likes my work. I stand behind every part I build. Thanks for everybody taking a look at my products.
    Brian

  15. 15 "se" Jun 18th, 2009 at 2:35 pm

    What about being insured on the parts you mfg??????

  16. 16 Brian Jun 23rd, 2009 at 9:31 am

    Yes Im insured. I also have a Manufacturing license.
    Brian

  17. 17 Mike Dec 22nd, 2010 at 1:41 pm

    Why spend that kind of money when you can buy a tried and true weld on from Santee or Paughco, two companies who have been building them forever. The axle mount on the hardtail pictured loos like it will break off at the first speed bump. I don’t care how much TIG welding is done on that axel mount it does not look safe, besides what the big deal with TIG welding anyway, in my lifetime things were welded with old Lincoln stick machines and YES even Oxy/Acet gas welders, it is all in the hands of the guy doing the welding, I gaurentee the Davidson boys didn’t have a TIG welder or a Lincoln Arc in their original shop for many years!!!
    I have an old flat head frame in my gargae and I can tell you for fact it was done with gas (flame)welder , there is not a spot on it where I can see any hint of an electric arc.

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