Dave Cook 1st American To Win AMD World Championship Of Bike Building

Dave Cook 1st American To Win AMD World Championship Of Bike Building
Not bad for somebody who decided to become a full-time Custom Builder only in 2002 (after being a semi=pro during a dozen of years). As soon as the custom bikes were setup under the giant white tent of the 2009 AMD World Championship Of Bike Building in Sturgis, the pros of the industry were buzzing about Dave Cook’s latest creation. Yes, at first glance he was a favorite and yesterday saw his triumph, meaning a full year of World Champion bragging rights, a lot of magazine features, interviews, but more important for the industry extra motivation to defend his title next year and stimulation for all custom builders.
83 top of the line custom motorcycles from around the world (compared to 67 in 2008), competed in this year’s event showcasing the most amazing display of custom motorcycles. Judging and voting is made by competitors. After being declared the winner Dave Cook of Cook Custom Choppers in Milwaukee, Wisconsin stated , “I have dedicated the best part of the last 3 years trying to win the World Championship, and finally I have achieved the ultimate recognition of my fellow professionals. It is very humbling”
Dominated by builders from Canada, Japan and Europe for the first 5 years, this year 7 of the top 10 competitors are from the USA. Second place is Kris Krome, of Freeland, Michigan. Third place went to Freddie “Krugger” Bertrand from Belgium.  Fourth place went to Stellan Egeland from Sweden and fith place to Satya Kraus of Cazedero, California. I will feature their bikes very soon.
davecookrambleratcyrilhuzeblogNot bad for somebody who decided to become a full-time Custom Builder only in 2002 (after being a semi-pro during a dozen of years). As soon as the custom bikes were setup under the giant white tent of the 2009 AMD World Championship Of Bike Building in Sturgis, the pros of the industry were buzzing about Dave Cook’s latest creation called “Rambler”. Yes, at first glance he was a favorite and on Wednesday in Sturgis saw his triumph, meaning a full year of World Champion bragging rights, a lot of magazine features, interviews, but more important for the industry extra motivation to defend his title next year and stimulation for all Custom Builders.
83 top-of-the-line custom motorcycles from around the world (compared to 67 in 2008), competed in this year’s event showcasing the most amazing display of custom motorcycles. Judging and voting is made by competitors. After being declared the winner Dave Cook of Cook Custom Choppers of Milwaukee, Wisconsin stated , “I have dedicated the best part of the last 3 years trying to win the World Championship, and finally I have achieved the ultimate recognition of my fellow professionals. It is very humbling”
Highlights Of Dave Cook Rambler Bike: 2009 Model 43. Engine Make / Size: 550cc “International”. Transmission Type: BMW 4speed R75 gear set in Cook modified BMW R25 3 speed case. Frame Make / Type: Cook Customs rigid. Front End: Cook Banana girder “extreme”. Rake: 35 degrees. Wheels: Front    Cook Customs 21″,  Rear Cook Customs 21″. Tires – Avon. Brakes: Front & Rear”: Cook Perimeter rotors/Jaybrake Caliper
Dominated by builders from Canada, Japan and Europe for the first 5 years, this year 7 of the top 10 competitors are from the USA. Second place is Kris Krome, of Freeland, Michigan. Third place went to Freddie “Krugger” Bertrand from Belgium.  Fourth place went to Stellan Egeland from Sweden and fith place to Satya Kraus of Cazedero, California. I will feature their bikes very soon. Dave Cook Custom Choppers. (Picture copyright AMD/Horst Rosler).

Other winners in other classes. Modified Harley-Davidson Class 1- Hot Dreams Marbella. 2-Roland Sands Design. 3- Radical Kustoms. Metric World Championship. 1- Kris Krome Customs. 2. Cook Customs. 3. SE Service. Production Manufacturer Class. 1-Independent Cycle East 2- Swift Motorcycle Co. 3- Darwin Motorcycles
Zipper's

27 Responses to “Dave Cook 1st American To Win AMD World Championship Of Bike Building”


  1. 1 Boss Hawg Aug 7th, 2009 at 7:21 am

    Dave,

    Congratulations!

    You have worked hard over the past few years and there are a times before when I think you should have won 1st, too!

    Boss Hawg

  2. 2 Seymour Aug 7th, 2009 at 10:13 am

    It is so refreshing to see something other than a V-Twin. Finally!

  3. 3 Alan Lee Aug 7th, 2009 at 11:52 am

    congratulations, Dave
    Beautiful pice of art

  4. 4 Alan Lee Aug 7th, 2009 at 11:53 am

    sorry guys,

    PIECE of ART

  5. 5 John E Adams Aug 7th, 2009 at 3:31 pm

    Kudos to Dave – what a beautiful work!!!

  6. 6 RogerG Aug 7th, 2009 at 8:49 pm

    Congrats Dave ! Looks great . Have to ask…what took you so long ? lol
    Cheers rg

  7. 7 Rodent Aug 8th, 2009 at 7:08 am

    About timefor an American to win in the United States of America

  8. 8 andy Aug 8th, 2009 at 10:42 am

    I agree, but what happened with the finish on the bike….

  9. 9 Wikked Kustoms Aug 8th, 2009 at 10:53 am

    Awesome build. Congrats!

  10. 10 Mike Kiwi Tomas, Kiwi Indian Motorcycles Aug 8th, 2009 at 11:37 am

    Well deserved as it is an outstanding bike on all levels. Congrats Dave and his awesome crew

  11. 11 Conrad Nicklus Aug 9th, 2009 at 12:16 am

    Im sorry but it has way too much shit going on for it to be a winner over some of the bieks and designs there. It is almost like people are going for the “lets not hide anything and let it all be seen look” now. Not my idea of “PEICE OF ART” that is my idea of “not knowing how to hide or show true art”…Sorry, its cool and all but there were several other bikes which far surpassed this bike.

    Conrad

  12. 12 andy Aug 9th, 2009 at 8:11 am

    I agree on that one, if you look on it far away it really looks good. But if you take a closer look, what happened………Was he tired?
    And that goes for alot of the bikes this year, and some of them was not able to run on the streets eather.

  13. 13 Gunner Aug 10th, 2009 at 8:43 am

    Beautiful bike and couldn’t have happened to a nicer regular down to eart home boy

  14. 14 Kevin "TEACH" Baas Aug 10th, 2009 at 10:03 am

    Congrats Dave you are a great guy and your talents are out of this world!

  15. 15 Wiz Aug 10th, 2009 at 10:05 am

    It ain’t fer ridin’, it’s fer lookin’ at! So what good is it? Maybe put a piece of flat glass on it for a coffee table, that’s about it. Let’s see you ride it 50 miles across the desert without a back-up truck followin’ ya. How did we get to the point of these $100,000. plus, worthless hunks of junk being touted as the pinacle of the biker lifestyle? They got nothing to do with being a biker. other than perhaps building it rather than buying it. It’s all about the long ride, on a bike you gave life to, alone with your thoughts, Freedom in the true sense. Wiz

  16. 16 Mazz Aug 10th, 2009 at 11:25 am

    Congrats to Dave Cook and his crew!!

    mazz.

  17. 17 Gina Woods Aug 10th, 2009 at 12:33 pm

    Woo Hoo Dave…great job. Dave is a hard workin- hard playin individual. Great team and grreat ethics!
    Thank goodness there are so many opinions on this blog that individualize all of us… otherwise we’d all be ridin the same iron! Whew how ackward would THAT be! I wanna be the only one that looks good ridn my pan (grin)

  18. 18 dale Aug 10th, 2009 at 1:00 pm

    Outstanding win!
    I looked at those bikes closely over a 3 day period of time. While many of them were not my flavor, the workmanship and creativity was at a level I have never seen before. I am glad it was not my decision, But Dave’s bike was a winner for sure.

    One other opinion that became very strong for me this show: the European bikes had a lot of technical and engineering advances, in workmanship and concept /
    But the American bikes were more ride able and about outstanding fit and finish. I was drawn to the American bikes for sure this year.

    Congrats Dave, and all of the winners and entries this year.

    Robin and team, thanks for making this a great event, and providing a good week of traffic. We enjoyed being on the lot in Champions park

    Dale

  19. 19 Sturgis Aug 10th, 2009 at 1:42 pm

    Excuse me, but are you blind??? Were the Swedish bikes not rideable? E>xcuse me again but Stellans bike was the most rideable bike in the contest, just look at the vidoes were the bike is punished on the track. And take a look at the Speedbob, that bike is for sureand ridable. And it would not take a monkey a long time to figure it out that Kris Chromes bike would need half sturgis to make a turn, and with that trail you should figure out the rest by your self. And as you mentioned the finish, what eyes did you looked with, I think the finish was not at a world championship level on Cooks bike, just look at the half finished brakes in front, the frame was full with scratches, and the “welds” was tacky with alot of holes, different bolts and it goes on and on. Dont missunderstand me know, I really like dave and the other bikes, but I think you should drive them with good handling and have a finish with absolutely zero faults in a world championship.

  20. 20 Sazzy Aug 11th, 2009 at 1:52 pm

    WOW I am thrilled and I really know this guy! Holy sh** bat man way to go! Can’t wait to get pics taken on that ride!

  21. 21 John "JP" Persitza Aug 11th, 2009 at 6:54 pm

    I have been reading the chain of comments following a number of different headlines regarding the World Championship on this blog. They all follow the same basic pattern. Predominantly positive comments offering congratulations (thanks to all of you, we appreciate the support) and alos a fair amount of negative comments based on one issue or another.

    I believe everyone has a right to their own opinion, so what I find bothersome about a lot of the comments is this. The congratulatory comments are presented as what they are, the opinion of the authors. A fair amount of the negative comments are presented as if their author believes their opinion to be a fact. That simply is not what an opinion is and it is very difficult to form a sound opinion without possessing all of the facts. Reading the comments I have I seen huge evidence of their authors not possessing all the facts, and I can not help but wonder why they think they have them.

    So, here are some facts.

    The Rambler was built to be a rider. It is currently a runner (a runner by our definition is a bike which starts and runs, but we wouldn’t choose to ride as transportation due to an awareness that the bike still requires mechanical adjustments to meet our safety, comfort and reliability standards ). It will soon be a rider (by our definition a bike we would choose for transportation purposes on a regular basis). As I type this Dave is in the shop playing with the timing on the Rambler. Jetting on the carb is also likely to be an issue, it is currently running lean and getting too hot. These are the key issues preventing the bike from being what we would call a rider. It is also leaking some oil. Nothing that would prevent us from using it as a rider, but since the engine is freshly assembled and all of the leaks appear to leaking from mechanical fastener points and are relatively easy fixes, why not fix them as part of the process of turning a runner into a rider.

    The issue of comfort seems to have fairly much made of it in some peoples opinions, which to me is ironic because in my world comfort seems to bear very little impact on what the hardest riding individuals I know choose to ride. Most of them ride something that I myself would be nervous on, and I daily ride a Cook rigid with a non functioning rear brake I haven’t taken the time to fix for some time now. So, in fact, with regard to comfort there is much evidence that rideability is more a function of the rider, not the ride.

    Safety is another issue mentioned often and it is certainly my opinion that it is a very important factor in the rideability of a motorcycle. In my opinion braking and handling are most important, with performance important only to the extent that whatever the bike in question has to offer lay somewhere in the range between adequate to run in the traffic conditions the bike will be ridden in and not overpowering the rest of the mechanicals the bike has to offer. The facts surrounding the Rambler is that the braking capabilities of it’s two perimeter rotor brakes are more than adequate to their task (which is why I personally have been staking my life on one such set up). The steering geometry and front suspension is a tried and true version of our standard set up which we have been riding for years, so I can’t see any reason to get any different results from this latest incarnation. This bike is set up with contemporary rubber and the power plant falls comfortably in the middle of the range described above.

    With regard to finish, it is a fact that the best finished bike in the show was not the Rambler. It would be sad if it were, as we put relatively little stock in finish, since we build these bikes to ride. The idea of fussing over the paint and polish on a bike that is meant to live on the road and in parking lots with as many people as care to given the opportunity to sit on, or (if we happen to like them) test ride simply makes no sense to us. Much respect to those who choose to make that a priority in their builds, it just isn’t our thing. One of the best things I have learned working with metal over the years is that it can be left as raw as you may want to, or worked and reworked to perfection. The Rambler is an example of working something to a finish we were comfortable with and then leaving it alone.

    We have always understood the World Championship to be an engineering competition, which is why Dave and the rest of us are willing to work so hard to perform well. The standards and values it represents are ones we aspire to achieve. The finish we wear with pride on our bikes is the coat of oil and road grime that each of them earn over time. Our goal is to build bikes that many may actually feel look better when they are wearing that coat, and still be able to dress them up to go out when we want to, which is the reason for Rambler’s stainless construction and simple black paint.

    Mechanical engineering: the point of the competition this particular bike won. Let’s look at the fact’s there. Dave Cook built a one of a kind engine/driveline from a collection of mismatched donor parts and his own hand made components on a garage builder’s budget. When he first came up with the idea, the reason for the Honda donor motor was the reliability and availability of the components the engine would be using. Important for the rideability requirements he had in mind for the bike. Per usual, everything took longer to make happen than expected. So rather than months, or at least weeks, of shake down time as was originally the plan (and honestly we figured would be REQUIRED), the one-off engine had fluids poured into it literally hours before we would have had no choice but to head out to the competition, runner or not. What happened was that this Frankenstein construction sputtered to life less than an hour after our first attempt to start it. By any set of historical standards for creative engineering of a one of a kind engine, I believe that to be quite an accomplishment. Now that is an opinion. What’s yours.

    JP Persitza

    Cook Customs

  22. 22 Tom Zimberoff Aug 12th, 2009 at 12:56 pm

    Those who know custom bikes had already known that Dave Cook is a champ. And he is a modest one, too. Who else in his position, while wearing his new bling ring, would have pitched in to help my crew and me load my truck at the end of the rally. I am proud to be able to put “Rambler” on a pedestal at the Appleton Museum of Art this October. (Will he use a real Rambler 4-banger and call it a Honda for his next opus?) Love the bike, Dave.

  23. 23 radical canada Aug 12th, 2009 at 11:37 pm

    boys boys boys!!!!! dave u did an outstanding bike…. ive been part and competed at the worlds for 3 years in a row now… i see the workmanship involved in every single entry, those of you with negative comments should go back to buying kit bikes off the internet or local parts store cuzzz you just dont get what the world championship is all about.. like i said , the bike runs and goes down the road…..so who cares how far it can go in terms of distance….we build them cuz they are a challenge in engeneering and design and they are not really meant to compete in some sort of 24 hrs or 5000 miles course….thats why the same or almost same guys do the worlds year after year…to push the limits of technology and design… GREAT JOB DAVE COOK AND KRIS KROME, SIMPLY OUTSTANDING BIKES!!! ps see you guys next year!!

  24. 24 Beezer Aug 15th, 2009 at 8:37 am

    !!! WAY TO GO COOKER!!! All you naysayers start building,and see if you can dethrone the CHAMP!!! Dave gave all of us a look into the future of customs with the “Rambler” V twins and British stuff is so last century!! Welcome to a new age in rolling two wheel art!! Dave Cook,often immitated, never duplicated!!! God speed to you and your crew!!

  25. 25 dave Aug 15th, 2009 at 12:18 pm

    Congrats Dave and co. !!! Well deserved win ! Will the couch be entered next year ???

  26. 26 rose Jan 6th, 2010 at 8:33 am

    Being from the Milwaukee/ Chicago area I have seen many Cook Customs around. They are always beautiful and usually steal the show in a humble manner. I just wanted to say that I thought that JP’s response to the criticism and praise was very respectful and professional. I look forward to seeing more Cook Customs soon! Congrats!

  27. 27 steve hauser Jan 11th, 2010 at 11:11 pm

    i was stunned. it is only a genius at work, to be able to come up with somthing so simple but , so ( inovative). congratulation you have started a new way of building motorcycles, and leeding other builders in to the budget age ,when you have to use what you have and build an expression of ones self. enginering of only the best have built with extreme budgits.thanks it is so refreshing i hope to see you in chicago steve hauser knox in

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