Siemens Green Electric Chopper

siemensbikeNothing against electric vehicles, but I am quite annoyed when I hear all these big international companies now claiming in their ads that “Green Is In Our DNA”!. I thought that DNA was acquired at birth, not when the price of oil goes up. Anyway, everybody is riding the Green trend, even OCC with this electric chopper built at the request of German company Siemens. Of course, the “Siemens Smart Chopper” (in 09, you have to be Green to be Smart) will be featured on a new episode of “American Choppers”. Are you still watching? If not, the only thing I can tell you is that the bike is mainly made of recycled materials, runs with an Advanced DC Motors Series Wound 8″ motor (anyone can explain in comments?), has a 60 miles range on a single 110-volt outlet charge with a maximum speed of 100 mph. I have to admit that on the picture this custom bike looks better than many Green bikes I have seen. Zoom, zoom. Orange County Choppers.

Zipper's

40 Responses to “Siemens Green Electric Chopper”


  1. 1 Todd8080 Aug 18th, 2009 at 6:12 am

    It’s ironic that the emphasis is on “green” because that’s what it would take plenty of to own and operate the Siemens/OCC bike.

    Given that Siemens has already paid a million dollars to OCC, let’s say some lucky bidder gets it for that same price. And let’s say the bike could theoretically go 100,000 miles over the course of its service life (quite a stretch considering how OCC bikes are slapped together). So without including the cost of electricity or numerous inevitable replacement batteries, the owner will be paying $10 per mile to ride; more if the bike never manages to hit the 100,000 mile mark.

    In that 100,000 miles you’d have to charge the batteries 1,667 times at five hours per charge, meaning you’d spend 347 days or 11½ months on the charger (not riding). Charging all those batteries that often has to get expensive.

    If you average 60 mph, you’d spend five hours charging for every hour of riding. To go from New York to Los Angeles at that rate, you’d have to charge the batteries for 232.5 hours. Add in actual travel time ( 46½ hours, optimistically) and you’ll spend 279 hours or 11.6 days on the road. Of course, finding 46 places to charge the bike 46 times is another matter entirely.

    But if I’m any judge of the typical OCC customer, the biggest expense will be trailering it everywhere.
    Sorry, forgot to add great post! Can’t wait to see your next post!

  2. 2 Steve Carr Aug 18th, 2009 at 6:29 am

    Somethings are just not meant to be made to be powered by battery’s and electric motor’s. For example, Custom Bikes and Hot Rod’s. I dont care how much oil we can save, these are not to be included in the “Green” Movement Damn-it!.

    Its a steak dinner without the steak and patato, patato, patato. Not everything has to be “Green”. Some things are meant to be “Red” or even “Black” for that matter, and with that being said, I say……….

    GIVE ME A BREAK WITH THIS GREEN SHIT!

    Steve Carr

  3. 3 FHP Scott Aug 18th, 2009 at 6:36 am

    Anyone ever state what it cost to charge the batteries?

    This figure of course would very depending on location. Battery chargers pull some amps.

    Nothing is free….but the powers that be market green like it is…..don’t be fooled.

  4. 4 Dave Blevins Aug 18th, 2009 at 7:04 am

    There is no such thing as a green total electric vehicle anyway… over 70 percent of America’s electricity comes from coal powered power generating systems, and coal is a fossil fuel. In my home state, and surrounding states for that matter, it over 90 percent, so electricity is actually a fossil fuel with over 40 percent of it lost throughout the power grid! Don’t even get me started about electric vehicle batteries and the anti-green footprint they create! Green is a bullshit notion, don’t buy into it.

  5. 5 Frito Bandido Aug 18th, 2009 at 8:13 am

    ol man Tutle is muy stupit !!! lectrik bike lik burro with chili in butt…….

    We muy muy tired of ol man Tutle !!

    Mi amigo Jesse James live !!!!!!

    Frito Bandito

  6. 6 Ken Glenn (Rat Judge) Aug 18th, 2009 at 8:34 am

    For the true biker or car guy there is no replacment for gas fumes and oil stains, and never will be.

  7. 7 Woody Aug 18th, 2009 at 8:43 am

    Dave Blevins beat me to it-until you can recharge your “green” electric vehicle into a solar panel or wind turbine it’s most like powered by coal. BTW most parts of the country continue to have problems charging a vehicle overnight with solar panels. (Tech report said something about it being dark out 🙂 )

  8. 8 NC Mike Aug 18th, 2009 at 8:46 am

    I am not on the green band wagon, but I will say this, electric motors can make some killer torq. I can’t remember the name, but there is an badass electric drag bike out there. I agree that chops and hotrods need to be fueled, but I bet your sportbikes will soon be electric. It is an easier, more dependable way to make things go really fast. Like I said, I am and always will be into hotrodding and choppers, but I am also an electrical engineer. I don’t see a problem with any electric motor lasting on a bike for 100,000, but I would bet any failure would be in the electronic controls. Especially if it is in a rigid….

  9. 9 John Aug 18th, 2009 at 9:26 am

    The modern environmental movement arose out of the wreckage of the New Left. They call themselves Green because they’re too yellow to admit they’re really Reds. Why do you think Lenin’s birthday was chosen to be the date of Earth Day & why do you think Obama appointed a communist to be his GREEN CZAR?

  10. 10 J Aug 18th, 2009 at 9:35 am

    Something wrong about riding a White Seimens bike…… Without protection…… Spurt…..

  11. 11 A 1 cycles Aug 18th, 2009 at 9:35 am

    the dragbike was called the “killacycle” and it runs high sevens in the 1/4 mile…old prostock chassis with an electric motor, true, electric motors make huge tourqe…but nothings free. last time i checked coal fired electric plants probably are not the cleanest way to make power? it comes from somewhere (electricity) i think its a big lie, if you figured out the carbon print (new green term) of an electric bike vs. a single cylinder commuter (true facts not propoganda) i think everyone might be suprised by the gas motor vs. electric charging? just my 1.5 cents (obama took the other .5 cent for health care.

  12. 12 Jeff Nicklus Aug 18th, 2009 at 9:58 am

    We have been playing with an electric bike platform for several years now. The problem we are having is not producing neck snapping power it is battery life. Some of the new lithium batteries coming onto the market may solve that problem ????? Admittedly the electric bike is not for everyone …… too damn quiet! Sure gets EPA off my ass though!

    Over & Out,

    Jeff

  13. 13 Dave Blevins Aug 18th, 2009 at 10:05 am

    Jeff,
    I agree the quiet motor might get the EPA off your back, but at the expense of transferring it to the Coal Producer’s back! Ha Ha Ha
    By the way, those lithium batteries are an eco nightmare too.

  14. 14 hoyt Aug 18th, 2009 at 10:47 am

    Todd8080 –

    How far do you think an early 1900’s motorcycle would have gone or how long would it have taken to cross the country in its early years of development? New tech takes time.

    Electrics will hold a place in the radically different energy equation in years to come. They most likely will not be the single form of personal transport, but they will serve a purpose.

    —-
    As far as coal-derived energy to replenish batteries goes… a lot of the infrastructure is also being developed &/or re-engineered. Technologies are advancing with storage and distribution to support wind and solar. In other words, technology is not advancing solely for personal transport. Its happening on a micro and macro scale. All of these combined with coal and nuclear play a role together. Harness and use energy sources wherever it makes sense in terms of net energy (e.g. ethanol is not a wise choice due to the “cost” of the energy expended to get the energy quotient). The state where I reside has loads of hydro and wind power now. Vast sections of it will also be able to use solar farms.

    The electric battery companies should start stating goals for longevity of their batteries and also state goals for the amount of recyclable content that goes into their batteries to truly provide confidence.

  15. 15 Rick Aug 18th, 2009 at 10:52 am

    There is a real badass electric sport bike being introduced next year called the “Mission One” from Mission Motors in San Francisco, CA. A top speed of 150 mph and range of 150 miles at a cost of under $70K. The roll-on power is immediate so torgue is huge. The problem is the range! There are no “Electric Stations” so I can only ride around town.

    Having said that, the “Electric” rage is coming and there is no stopping it.

  16. 16 hoyt Aug 18th, 2009 at 10:58 am

    …other than that, i agree. Our hobby would not be the same without I-C engines with all of their mechanical magic (especially air-cooled).

    Algae-based fuel holds a lot of promise.

  17. 17 FUJI Aug 18th, 2009 at 11:25 am

    Problem solved for the noise factor . Do as we did when we were kids put/ attach a playing card to the forks with a cloths pin and let it flip from spoke to spoke for the real potato sound.

  18. 18 Mike Greenwald Aug 18th, 2009 at 11:35 am

    Just the like trend in rock and roll this trend will go “unplugged”.

  19. 19 Jeff Nicklus Aug 18th, 2009 at 11:57 am

    At some point in time, hopefully not in my life time or my children’s, the internal combustion engine will go the way of the dinosaurs. Considering the government will not trust me with any nuclear material (can’t imagine why ???) for development of a nuke powered scooter ……. I suppose I will just have to keep playing with the electric powered unit when I am bored!

    FUJI: You have a sick warped mind …. I like that!

    Over & Out,

    Jeff

  20. 20 Mike Avila Aug 18th, 2009 at 12:31 pm

    This is nothing new Arlen Ness built a battery powered bike 15 years ago……………….

  21. 21 A 1 cycles Aug 18th, 2009 at 1:09 pm

    mike corbin did also..he held the electric land speed record actually,,,,nothing new, many home builders have done this also. i have a guy in town here with a f’n 1985 s-10 blazer full of batteries..explosion waiting to happen. but it is exciting. time will tell.. and i wouldnt like my bike to sound like a slot car that i played with as a kid

  22. 22 FUJI Aug 18th, 2009 at 1:48 pm

    Frito Bandido:
    Tell me about your natural gas bike.

  23. 23 nicker Aug 18th, 2009 at 3:47 pm

    Rubber Band Power.
    -no coal
    -no oil
    -no charging

    When it stops just wind it up.

    -nicker-

  24. 24 Todd8080 Aug 18th, 2009 at 4:24 pm

    Hoyt wrote:

    “Todd8080 –

    How far do you think an early 1900’s motorcycle would have gone or how long would it have taken to cross the country in its early years of development? New tech takes time.”

    Apples and oranges, Hoyt. All motorcycles of the early 1900s performed similarly. The 2009 Siemens/OCC bike couldn’t keep up with a 2009 50cc moped on a cross-country ride.

    Until battery technology catches up to advances in electric motor development, it’s utterly pointless to build, sell or buy an electric motorcycle, especially one that costs a million dollars.

    When the charge time versus ride time ratio is reversed (1:5 as opposed to 5:1), then electric motorcycles will be approaching the realm of practicality. Until then, experimenters should not try to market them as feasible alternatives to gasoline-powered motorcycles. It’s a disservice to the public.

    On a different note, that’s an interesting edit to my first post, Cyril. I’m referring to the added last line.

  25. 25 alan Aug 18th, 2009 at 6:37 pm

    like the stone
    i see a green bike and i want to PAINT IN BLACK

    like steve say motorcycle hotrod need to make some noise and pullution
    that rock n roll

    f.. the green

  26. 26 Sam Costa Aug 19th, 2009 at 9:46 am

    What kills me is all this talk about “green”… In order to charge a battery you need Voltage, voltage that’s found in your wall at home, in the office, garage, etc.. It’s certainly not free and with all this talk that about saving energy with energy efficient light bulbs and washer/dryers and etc, etc.. this would just add to the list of wasting energy!

    Call me old fashioned, but I’ll use good ole gas on my bike please.

  27. 27 hoyt Aug 19th, 2009 at 12:16 pm

    Todd8080 –

    My comment is nothing about apples to oranges at all. Your first post reads like you’re expecting an electric to perform right out of the gate on par with gas power. None of the electric manufacturers are setting those expectations. If they did, they won’t be in business much longer. It is obvious to the seller and buyer of the range at the time of the sale.

    Todd8080: “Until battery technology catches up to advances in electric motor development, it’s utterly pointless to build, sell or buy an electric motorcycle, especially one that costs a million dollars.”

    How do you expect the tech to develop? Using your comparison of old bikes: considering the owner involvement in the operation alone of those machines, it took severely intrigued (bordering on brave*) individuals to pay for those machines in the early days…

    *roads were shit, tires, suspension non-existent, manually-operated oiling systems, brakes, etc. Compare all of that to a horse and you can bet those early bikes took some “selling”

  28. 28 Jeff Nicklus Aug 19th, 2009 at 12:41 pm

    Hoyt,

    Good comment!

    Over & Out,

    Jeff

  29. 29 FUJI Aug 19th, 2009 at 12:54 pm

    HOYT: Aug 18th, 2009 at 10:58 am

    Algae-based fuel holds a lot of promise.
    —————————————————————————————————————————————
    I found your statement to be spot on after watching a documentary on algae based fuel.

    At the early stages of producing algae fuel it equates out to eight dollars a gallon.

    With further research the price will de-escalate.

    We are thirsty people so how grand of a project would this be?

  30. 30 hoyt Aug 19th, 2009 at 1:20 pm

    It is fascinating & a huge endeavor. Apparently algae can be cultivated just about anywhere and harvested (i think) hourly. Considering offshore drilling is going to 7000+ ft. deep (think about that accomplishment), it is no wonder the petro companies are investing in algae research.

    home-grown fuel – yeah, man.

  31. 31 just my opinion Aug 19th, 2009 at 1:24 pm

    Anyone doubting the power of an electric motor needs to look no further than the railroad companies. The trains have been pulled along the tracks for years with electric motors. Now it is true that those electric motor get power through a generator driven by a diesel engine. But non the less the end power is the electric motors. I could see maybe some day someone will build motorcycles using a small engine to turn a small generator that would power the electric motor. It would still require fuel but much less than is currently needed. In the case of the train. A train can move over 100 semi-trailers a distance of 150 miles for the same cost that one single semi-truck moves one semi-trailer the same 150 miles. I don’t see electric motors taking over any time soon but the future could be very different from what we know.

  32. 32 Todd8080 Aug 19th, 2009 at 3:58 pm

    Hoyt wrote:

    “Your first post reads like you’re expecting an electric to perform right out of the gate on par with gas power.”

    Performance isn’t the problem; modern electric motors produce ample power. The problem is fuel. Batteries are inefficient as a fuel source because they weigh several times what a tank of gasoline weighs, yet only power the vehicle for a very short distance. That’s fine for a ¼ mile drag bike, but not for a street bike.

    Hoyt wrote:

    “How do you expect the tech to develop? Using your comparison of old bikes: considering the owner involvement in the operation alone of those machines, it took severely intrigued (bordering on brave*) individuals to pay for those machines in the early days…
    *roads were shit, tires, suspension non-existent, manually-operated oiling systems, brakes, etc. Compare all of that to a horse and you can bet those early bikes took some ‘selling’”

    Took some selling? What history book did you read? Following the invention of the gas-powered motorcycle, the public went absolutely nuts buying them. By the ‘Teens there were no less than 150 companies manufacturing motorcycles in the U.S., and that’s a conservative number (some say as many as 300). Hell, you could buy a motorcycle right out of the Sears & Roebuck catalog.
    Just look at how Harley’s production figures grew in their first decade, from one bike in 1903 to 12,904 in 1913. The MoCo went from two guys in a 10′ x 15’ shed to 480 workers in an 80,000 square foot factory in that same time frame.
    Even on America’s turn-of-the-century dirt roads, a motorcycle could travel many times the distance a horse could, and provide a lot more fun doing it. You’d have to be crazy not to see the appeal in that.

  33. 33 hoyt Aug 21st, 2009 at 11:27 am

    Todd8080 wrote: “Following the invention of the gas-powered motorcycle”

    what exactly happened leading up to that point?

    It took some selling, backed up by loads of hours from ambitious & clever folks to go from the early days to the numbers you mentioned. In a hurry.

    There are parallels to what is going on in the electric world. Good thing those people back then didn’t listen to similar comments like yours, “it’s utterly pointless to build, sell or buy an electric motorcycle”.

    I’m not an electric “fan” at all* (no pun intended), but it seems “utterly pointless” to be a nay sayer when there are some very “bright” people working on this technology.

    *the instant torque potential is about the only thing that captures my attention

  34. 34 George Aug 21st, 2009 at 10:43 pm

    Check out the electric trike at http://www.blackbayev.com

    It goes 80mph with incredible torque!

    George

  35. 35 Todd8080 Aug 22nd, 2009 at 2:37 am

    Hoyt, I didn’t say “it’s utterly pointless to build, sell or buy an electric motorcycle”. You conveniently left off part of the sentence. What I said was ““Until battery technology catches up to advances in electric motor development, it’s utterly pointless to build, sell or buy an electric motorcycle, especially one that costs a million dollars.” Big difference.

    Personally I’d love to see someone make a practical electric motorcycle, but that isn’t going to happen for quite a while, for reasons stated above.

    Should people continue to develop electric motorcycles? Of course. But just don’t try to sell them to the public until you actually come up with a practical design. A million-dollar electric bike that can only go sixty miles before needing a five-hour recharge is pretty much the polar opposite of practical.

  36. 36 Tyrone @ electric bikes Aug 24th, 2009 at 1:36 am

    More companies are turning to the electric vehicle trend as popularity for them was initially underestimated. I agree the overuse of “green” in marketing campaigns is annoying, it doesn’t take much brain power to know that a bike powered by electricity is “greener” than a petrol one.

  37. 37 GTLover Aug 24th, 2009 at 1:12 pm

    Recycled materials, eh? Like recycled steel in the frame and tinwork, recycled aluminum in the billet, regrind in the rubber – heck, you could probably find at least 40% “post-consumer” recycled materials in ANY bike these days. This thing’s about as green as my poop after eating froot loops for a week. You want an eco-friendly chopper? There’s some dudes who recycle old bikes into custom lorider choppers, that are ZERO emissions: bicycles!

  38. 38 hoyt Aug 24th, 2009 at 2:02 pm

    Todd8080 –

    a million dollar electric is not the only one for sale, so that price tag should be conveniently left out. The other electric bikes are still way too expensive for many people, but you still haven’t acknowledged how are these companies supposed to further develop the bikes without selling early, viable commuting examples of them.

    Someone can buy a $15k Brammo as a daily commuter with very practical results.

    You “conveniently” did not reply to this:

    “Todd8080 wrote: “Following the invention of the gas-powered motorcycle”

    what exactly happened leading up to the point of “following the invention of the gas-powered motorcycle”?….

    Loads of R&D, refinement, and the willingness of some people to buy early models.

  39. 39 Dick Gazinia Aug 30th, 2009 at 7:21 pm

    Toyota–the world’s leading producer of “bio-friendly” hybrid cars–is well aware of the problems associated with the batteries in these green beasts, and the company is already working on a plan for safe, long-term disposal of the dead cells. In a bizarre marriage with the Chinese aerospace industry, Toyota is sharing notes on hybrid technology with Chinese carmakers in exchange for cargo services to the outer limits of our solar system. Apparently, China and Toyota have devised a scheme to launch old car batteries to Venus and beyond, where the flotsam and jetsam will float aimlessly for generations or burn up upon entry to any number of planetary atmospheres.

    If “operation space junk” works, we could see a day when traces of OCC’s Seimans build-up lands in Uranus…

    HA! I got you.

  40. 40 nicker Aug 30th, 2009 at 8:03 pm

    Dick,

    RE:
    “…. China and Toyota have devised a scheme to launch old car batteries to Venus and beyond, where the flotsam and jetsam will float aimlessly for generations or burn up upon entry to any number of planetary atmospheres…”

    Zat-spost-a make batteries cheaper?
    Lets hope some other extraterestrials don’t do it to us………

    -nicker-

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