Rusty Trombone

While most bikers will continue to do everything to prevent their motorcycles from rusting, others will choose the rusty look to make their old bikes look “root”. It’s even a new trend in the custom motorcycle industry, some “rusting” their machines on purpose, because as you know, like gray hair, rust may inspire respect. In greater Portland the team Jason Grimes/Doug Rasmuson at Northeast Chop Shop works both on hot rods and custom motorcycles. And quite a few of them, when completed, keep the appearance of their real age, or at least the age of the engine. Like “Rusty” Trombone a 1946 Harley WL Flathead (45″) powered customized bike with some of today’s parts, although looking like having slowly aged during 65+ years.

The shop hand-fabricated the 2-piece spine design gas tank with the stainless steel oil tank fitted in it between the 2 halves. Pipes we also made by NCS in stainless steel. Carb is a stock linkert. Primary clutch hub is stock. The front sprocket and ring gear were made by Bare Knuckle Choppers and then tig-welded in place. Rear fender is hand forged damascus steel. The seat pan, battery/coil box and gas tank plates and spine are made from damascus that took over 500 hours to form. All the copper is hand formed and hammered to create the detail texture. Sissy bar was hand forged and bars are alsp a NCS one-off creation. Headlight and tailight are vintage. Northeast Chop Shop. (photography copyright Onno Wieringa for AMD World Championship courtesy to Cyril Huze)

Business Northeast Chop Shop
Windham, ME. USA
Bike Name Rusty Trombone
Builders Name Jason Grimes
Owner Jason Grimes
Year / Model 1946 WL
Engine Make / Size Flathead 45″
Frame Make / Type 1946 WL
Rake Stock Stretch Stock
Trail Stock
Front End Super narrow springer / Bare Knuckle Choppers
Swingarm None
Drivetrain Stock
Wheels [Front] 21″ spool Paughco
Wheels [Rear] Stock 18″
Tire [Front] Avon Speedmaster 21″
Tyre [Rear] Firestone Delix Champion 18″
Brakes [Front] None
Brakes [Rear] Stock drum
Painter None
Chroming / Plating None

Zipper's

15 Responses to “Rusty Trombone”


  1. 1 Greeko May 31st, 2013 at 9:37 am

    Rust. Why not?

  2. 2 Ray Shaft May 31st, 2013 at 9:40 am

    Sand blast, paint it and it’s worth 5 times more.

  3. 3 Rodent May 31st, 2013 at 9:41 am

    Some people see the trend, others are blind!

  4. 4 Zipper May 31st, 2013 at 8:04 pm

    A piece for the office. A true work of art. ..Z

  5. 5 RUB Jun 1st, 2013 at 6:53 am

    this bike would be so much cooler if someone had actually rolled it out of a barn , cleaned it up and rode the sheet out of it . this new trend of making stuff look old , with over 500 man hours , isn’t the way it’s supposed to be . Met a guy on an old flat head @ the key west poker run , He had to stop every hour or two to “adjust” things . Now that was a Kool bike !

  6. 6 Terence Tory Jun 1st, 2013 at 8:47 am

    This WL is a good effort,but this trend of stripping paint off and leaving damp it to mature like fine wine to get a “patina” is not art or clever.It’s just taking the paint off and letting it rust.Repeat:It’s just taking the paint off and letting it rust.It is not a process of amazing creativity,the appliance of science or art.Repeat:It’s just taking the paint off and letting it rust.

  7. 7 Dave Blevins Jun 1st, 2013 at 10:38 am

    Love that front end.

  8. 8 Johnny Wolf Jun 1st, 2013 at 11:54 am

    …the trend that was played out by 2005. Regardless of when, Faux patina= Lame.

  9. 9 Chop Jun 1st, 2013 at 4:16 pm

    Motorcycles like these are art or sculptures to many people………never seen metallic paint that you can fall into sitting in a museum or gallery. My current show bike here in Australia has patina and gets more votes and lookers taking pics that others. As for show prep time its great, garage and transport scratches are kool and a feather duster just before judging. Sorry Johnny if it was played out by ’05 how come old, rust, copper, brass and raw metal are still the current trend……….suppose on a late model bike this would clash with the plastic parts and the plastic riders.

  10. 10 Terence Tory Jun 2nd, 2013 at 3:39 am

    Chop:So what you are saying is real fake patina impresses people.If you can be careless and slack with your show bike,maybe you should call it “easy street”.All this “patina” “art” “trend” talk is like women talking about Louis Viutton handbags or Lalique vases.In case you haven’t realized,plastic riders on drastic plastic hammer real steel riders every time.I can’t help thinking you might play “I Want To Break Free” on your iPod when you break out the feather duster at a show:I’d love to see that!

  11. 11 Iron Horse Jun 2nd, 2013 at 7:46 am

    I like it…fake patina or not. Most of us aren’t lucky enough to run into ‘barn finds’ that we can just dust off and ride the crap out of. Well done guys. I especially like the use of damascus for various items on the bike.

  12. 12 speakeasymotors Jun 3rd, 2013 at 9:16 pm

    Jason builds beautiful bikes that stand out in the crowd. True craftsman, and a real awesome dude too

  13. 13 Chop Jun 4th, 2013 at 1:17 am

    Thanks for the tips Terence……can you please download the music selection for me from your collection.

  14. 14 Chaos Cycle Jun 4th, 2013 at 10:17 am

    this is a phenomenal bike in person, the craftsmanship in the rear fender alone is more than most of these keyboard commandos can handle. Don’t like patina that’s cool, but don’t knock the work!

  15. 15 ride easy Jul 9th, 2013 at 1:15 pm

    seen this bike at a show, these pics don’t even show all the Damascus work on this bike. the man hours in that alone must be high. it is amazing to see in person. so many little details. it is not an old barn bike it is a work of art for sure. seen other bikes by this guy and he is very talented, attention to every little detail to make a very unique ”one of a kind’ bike everytime. cuddos to you guys for making something no one else has

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