New 2013 CVO Road King. First Road King With Factory-Installed Audio System.

The CVO™ Road King® combines the largest displacement V-Twin engine offered by Harley-Davidson (Twin Cam 110″) with the innovative Vented Wind Splitter windshield and the first audiosystem offered on a Road King® model, for unmatched touring performance, comfort and custom exclusivity. Production will be limited to approximately 3,650 units assembled at the Harley-Davidson Vehicle Operations facility in York, Pa.

The CVO™ Road King® is built on the innovative Harley-Davidson® Touring chassis, based on a single-spar, rigid backbone frame and a stout swingarm developed to withstand the demands of long-haul touring riders and today’s more powerful engines.

The first factory-installed Road King audio system includes a 200-watt amplifier and an interface module for an included 8GB Apple® iPod® controlled by buttons on the handlebar. The system drives two 5×7-inch speakers with bridged tweeters located on the saddlebag lids, and two 5.25-inch speakers with bridged tweeters mounted in the fairing lowers.

The new detachable Vented Wind Splitter windshield was developed by Harley-Davidson and tested in the Wichita State University wind tunnel to relieve low pressure behind the windshield and significantly reduce buffeting at the rider position. A vane within the vent should be adjusted to match air flow to the rider’s height.

A low-profile console holds a combination speedometer/tachometer with programmable back-light colors. Other CVO Road King features include a chrome billet-style extended reach heel shifter, Mirror Chrome Agitator Custom wheels, extended saddlebag bottoms with a custom fascia and LED lighting, a new chromed handlebar with an ergonomic bend, and Slipstream Collection hand and foot controls.

A new solo touring seat and the removable passenger pillion and backrest have a tuck-and-roll leather insert. A new painting process features hand-finished graphics created with textures and solvents in a multi-step process that results in unique detailing on each motorcycle. Three color options are available, including the 110th anniversary scheme.

The first factory-installed Road King audio system includes a 200-watt amplifier and an interface module for an included 8GB Apple® iPod® controlled by buttons on the handlebar. The system drives two 5×7-inch speakers with bridged tweeters located on the saddlebag lids, and two 5.25-inch speakers with bridged tweeters mounted in the fairing lowers. The new detachable Vented Wind Splitter windshield was developed by Harley-Davidson and tested in the Wichita State University wind tunnel to relieve low pressure behind the windshield and significantly reduce buffeting at the rider position. A vane within the vent should be adjusted to match air flow to the rider’s height. A low-profile console holds a combination speedometer/tachometer with programmable back-light colors.

Other CVO Road King features include a chrome billet-style extended reach heel shifter, Mirror Chrome Agitator Custom wheels, extended saddlebag bottoms with a custom fascia and LED lighting, a new chromed handlebar with an ergonomic bend, and Slipstream Collection hand and foot controls. A new solo touring seat and the removable passenger pillion and backrest have a tuck-and-roll leather insert. A new painting process features hand-finished graphics created with textures and solvents in a multi-step process that results in unique detailing on each motorcycle. Three color options are available, including the 110th anniversary scheme.

U.S. MSRP $29,999. U.S. MSRP (Anniversary) $30,999

Other features include:

• Anti-Lock Brakes • Electronic Cruise Control • Chrome Accessories • Black high-torque 1.4kW starter • Braided stainless steel brake and clutch lines • Harley-Davidson® Smart Security System with siren • Commemorative CVO™ ignition key with display box • Customer Care package that includes a tool kit, microfiber detail cloth, H-D® jiffy stand coaster, and indoor/outdoor motorcycle storage cover with embroidered CVO™ logo.

 

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11 Responses to “New 2013 CVO Road King. First Road King With Factory-Installed Audio System.”


  1. 1 BobS Aug 24th, 2012 at 10:28 am

    The new shield sounds interesting but throw an iPod and Ultra lowers on an RK…I dunno, jury is out on that one. If music was that important to me I think I would just go Street Glide.

  2. 2 rebel Aug 24th, 2012 at 11:40 am

    a great added distraction for the already distracted, please come back choppers, were sorry !

  3. 3 GuitarSlinger Aug 24th, 2012 at 2:43 pm

    Am I the only one that thinks Loud Stereo’s on Loud M/C’s is in fact the most counterproductive and foolish waste of money in the M/C World ? Isn’t the whole idea of riding a bike that of being one with your surroundings …. rather than doing your darndest to drown the surroundings out ? Isn’t that at least part of the justification for not wanting Helmet Laws ? Helmets blocking out the surrounding sounds ?

    Seems to me …. other than trying to do the dog marking his territory thing ( in this case with excessive noise … both from the pipes and the stereo ) the only real excuse/reason for putting a loud stereo on a bike of any kind … is because you’re really not in love with riding a bike ….. and wish you were in a car

    Honestly every time a H-D or Victory rolls by with loud pipes and stereo I wind up doing the Eddie Murphy thing from ” Beverly Hills Cop ” when he saw the Michael Jackson clones . Laughing my ___ off

  4. 4 Woody Aug 24th, 2012 at 7:55 pm

    @guitar. Some commutes are pretty damn boring, bike or not. Many a morning when heading into work at 4:30 AM I enjoyed having some rock & roll shaking out the cobwebs. Why make the assumption bikes w/radios also have loud exhausts? Only two bikes I’ve owned were “obnoxious” in some folks’ minds and these stock RKings obviously don’t roll off the dealer’s floor w/loud exhausts, etc. Each to their own, sometimes I like to hear the exhaust, other times the tunes. There’s controls to let me do both :)

  5. 5 Toby Aug 25th, 2012 at 10:15 am

    An 8 gig iPod. 8 gig? Pretty anemic. I agree with all the points of view above. $3000 sound systems on a bike are silly. But having some tunes or sports talk on the long commute is nice too.

    After market earbuds are a good solution. The better ones mimic ballistic (shooters) buds and cancel out the high frequency noises. You can actually hear your surroundings better than with no bud.

  6. 6 rob Aug 25th, 2012 at 12:22 pm

    To each,his own. I picked up a bottom line black RK. I’m in the process of makin’ it mine……….a lot cheper than a CVO…………..well maybe not that much cheaper.

  7. 7 Jay Aug 27th, 2012 at 5:27 pm

    My ride is an 03 Screamin Eagle Road King and I would not dirty it up with any kind of sound system. I LIKE to hear the wind and any other sounds that drift by. The new Road King is appealing in many ways but can they deduct three grand off the price if I don’t want the tunes?

  8. 8 Blackmax Aug 27th, 2012 at 6:48 pm

    Road King with sound in the lowers ???
    Personally I hate lowers, except with it’s below 40 degress.
    The people I’ve asked about this are of the opinion that Road Kings are for the riders who want the raw elemental experience with a little comfort and some place to put your stuff.
    If want / need sound i would buy a Street / Road Glide or an Ultra.

    Hey, instead of the sound system how about a JIMS 121 or 131 ?????
    that’s a trade I’d make anyday

  9. 9 Toby Sep 1st, 2012 at 12:15 pm

    I think that last (bottom) picture is an anniversary edition of the RK and not a CVO.

  10. 10 Tom Oct 5th, 2012 at 11:38 am

    I’m not a big fan of what they did to last years CVO Street Glide with all the stereo power and speakers, and now they’ve carried over part of it to his years Road King. I dont like the lowers, either and the speakers in the saddle bag lids make me wonder if that would be a potential source for leaks later on……..

  11. 11 Jeremy Jan 12th, 2013 at 9:21 am

    If I were to add my 5cents worth I would not add speakers on either, the only time that I would use them is while washing the bike. What I would recommend is making the saddle bags detachable with a clean look behind them when removed, so for everyday use you can leave them off and then put them on when making a long trip etc.
    Here in the east coast of South Africa we certainly have no use for lowers either and that would be the first thing that I remove when I get my bike

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