The New One from The Olsen’s. A Custom 1923 Harley JD Boardtrack Racer.

Builder Matt Olsen from Carl’s Cycle Supply sent me the just edited video of the custom bike he and his wife Britney built for the 5th edition of the Born-Free Event (June 29 at Oak Canyon Ranch, Silverdao CA). Matt was last year’s best of show with a custom Knucklehead, and to defend his title in 2013 the couple built a gorgeous 1923 Harley JD Boardtrack that Britney intends to race. The Born-Free event is about the love of old motorcycles and like minded individuals having a good time together and enjoying bikes of the past.

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27 Responses to “The New One from The Olsen’s. A Custom 1923 Harley JD Boardtrack Racer.”


  1. 1 Shifter Jun 9th, 2013 at 9:02 am

    Nice work

  2. 2 Rodent Jun 9th, 2013 at 10:44 am

    Great looking rider

  3. 3 uhl Jun 9th, 2013 at 10:47 am

    love Matt’s creations!

  4. 4 ray c wheeler Jun 9th, 2013 at 12:47 pm

    Looks like a runner to me……

    Good job….

  5. 5 Rob Campbell Jun 9th, 2013 at 1:04 pm

    I thought those old bikes only came in black and white-you never see one of the old pictures showing color on the bike. Or anything else now that I think of it…

  6. 6 Greeko Jun 9th, 2013 at 1:36 pm

    Just a remark. All these old school jobs are nice. But these builders don’t buy parts, can’t financially support the motorcycle industry. They benefit to the MoCo image, that’s it.

  7. 7 Terence Tory Jun 9th, 2013 at 4:04 pm

    While we look back with big doggie eyes at obsolete designs long thrown,…..The Chinese are building 300MPH bullet trains.It’s something about priorities.I’m sure Sigmund Freud described nostalgia as an illness.Turning an old basket of bits into a runner and shiny is not really a custom,it’s a resto.It’s a fine bike nonetheless.

  8. 8 Larry Coleman Jun 9th, 2013 at 7:47 pm

    The major oem’s build and advance technology and the aftermarket thrives just fine. Thank goodness for folks who perpetuate history so that we may remember where we came from and how we got here. Never, I repeat, Never, forget where you came from.

  9. 9 Terence Tory Jun 9th, 2013 at 8:07 pm

    Larry,you don’t “perpetuate history”.History is done and then you move on.Regurgitation and nostalgia lead nowhere.Try not forgetting where the Indian name came from:The Indians.

  10. 10 Brian Jun 10th, 2013 at 8:13 am

    Matts work is always top notch. Great craftsmen. Can wait to see the bike in person. Great Job Matt and Britney…….

  11. 11 John E Adams Jun 10th, 2013 at 10:48 am

    Always amazed with Matt’s wonderful work – gorgeous!!

  12. 12 CafeSportyTC Jun 10th, 2013 at 1:41 pm

    love the old F-heads… just love em

  13. 13 Pat Simmons Jun 10th, 2013 at 2:52 pm

    Fantastic bike Matt and Britney! What a beauty, and the bike’s nice too… Good luck to you guys on the track. I know you’re gonna have some major fun. Odd comments from the newbies. I guess they just don’t know much about the industry behind the antique and vintage motorcycle market these days. I encourage you to do some research about all the companies, individuals, products, museums, and organizations that are generating jobs, and major income for thousands of people. These bikes may look old, but they’re not just restored, they’re literally refabricated. That takes, new pistons, rods, bearings, gears, chains, paint, lubrication, and so much more. Most, if not all supplied by American companies directly linked to the motorcycle market place. By the way those trains in China are forever breaking down, and you could get the death penalty over there for smokin’ a joint. They need to work on their priorities…

  14. 14 Olive Oil Jun 10th, 2013 at 3:17 pm

    I bought my wife a vaccum cleaner instead of a ring !!

  15. 15 Martin Twofeather Jun 10th, 2013 at 3:37 pm

    Great job Matt……..

  16. 16 Terence Tory Jun 10th, 2013 at 3:46 pm

    “These bikes may look old, but they’re not just restored, they’re literally refabricated. That takes, new pistons, rods, bearings, gears, chains, paint, lubrication, and so much more.” I know.

  17. 17 Septic the Sceptic Jun 10th, 2013 at 5:01 pm

    Greeko and Terry should read the story of this bike. It isn’t a resto, and it certainly doesn’t pander to the MoCo.

  18. 18 Joe Mielke Jun 10th, 2013 at 5:09 pm

    Good luck Matt and Britney!

  19. 19 richard Jun 10th, 2013 at 6:41 pm

    “Just a remark. All these old school jobs are nice. But these builders don’t buy parts, can’t financially support the motorcycle industry. They benefit to the MoCo image, that’s it”.

    “Larry,you don’t “perpetuate history”.History is done and then you move on.Regurgitation and nostalgia lead nowhere.Try not forgetting where the Indian name came from:The Indians”.

    With respect to these remarks….

    I believe the “MoCo” IS part of the motorcycle Industry.

    History is important. If it were not for the actions taken of those before us (history), we wouldn’t have the motorcycles we have today. E.G. Where would we be without the WHEEL? The other aspect of restoring old bikes etc., is that we can marvel at the ingenuity and resourcefulness of those early pioneers and admire some of the wonderful, beautiful bikes that evolved into the current modern day motorcycle.

  20. 20 Mike Tomas, Kiwi Indian Jun 11th, 2013 at 9:40 am

    It takes an enormous amount of work and especially know how to create a vintage masterpiece like this. It is true craftsmanship at its finest. It’s not about buying a new part and assembling a bike such as what is common place today. This is “master bike building” in its finest form. We just like many others in the vintage community support the employment rolls and many many business across this great country. Stop by Matt’s or my place and we will both gladly show you around and see what we have to start out with. We have to take a total pile of crap parts in boxes and turn it into a stunning masterpiece called a classic motorcycle better than it ever left its factory. Nice job Matt and Brittney. I certainly can appreciate the work that you put into your bikes and the best is yet to come, riding them. Build em to ride. Great job. Love the Indian in the video. Thanks for thinking of me lol.

  21. 21 Joe Mielke Jun 11th, 2013 at 12:27 pm

    “We mock what we don’t understand.” – Austin Millbarge

  22. 22 Terence Tory Jun 11th, 2013 at 6:11 pm

    Kiwi Indian:”We have to take a total pile of crap parts in boxes” .Retrorustorama is not master building,starting from drawings from scratch and creating something new is.Casting up new barrels from an old copy or boring new main bearing housings in old OEM cases is just basic M/C engineering,it is not miraculous or amazing.Guys like Shoichiro Irimajiri and Giulio Carcano were master builders,and not just people getting stone age bikes from another century to go “pop” “fart” “bang”.

    Jon: “Assumption is filling holes of the unknown with ignorance.”-Sigmund Freud.

  23. 23 Septic the Sceptic Jun 11th, 2013 at 9:48 pm

    Time for Terry to put up, or the other thing.

  24. 24 Joe Mielke Jun 13th, 2013 at 7:02 pm

    I have had the pleasure of spending many hours in Matt’s Father’s shop working on old motorcycles. It is a real treat. The motorcycle in the video above has a rebuilt vintage Harley Engine. For the most part the rest of the motorcycle is a new hand made parts. And some repurposed parts. The frame, New hand made frame. The front end is made from new and repurposed parts. The fuel tank, oil tank, New hand made parts. The seat pan was hand made and the leather work is new hand shaped and stitched leather. The wheels are build from some repurposed parts and some newly machined parts. The Primary drive and cover, New, Hand made parts. the handle bars made from new materials and some repurposed old parts.

    I personally can take no credit for making any of the parts. I did however visit the shop twice during the building of this motorcycle. I helped Matt by doing some busy work in the shop for Matt to relieve some of the pressure to build this motorcycle. I just got my hands dirty doing this and doing that. A lot of wet sending and polishing on his tanks. What a blast! Being surrounded by great American history while spending time with my frind working on motorcycles.

    Anyone who assumes that they know what does or does not go into building a motorcycle like this just needs to appreciate the craftsmanship and art of it all. Unless you are there, hands on, you have no idea.

    The fact that anyone looks at this motorcycle and believes that it is just a restoration, proves the quality of the work.

    The people who “know” are the ones who can certainly appreciate what is see in this video.

    This motorcycle is “Art”, functional bad ass race bike “ART”. The pointless debate is over.

    Bravo Matt!

  25. 25 Terence Tory Jun 14th, 2013 at 6:03 am

    Jon:”Anyone who assumes that they know what does or does not go into building a motorcycle like this just needs to appreciate the craftsmanship and art of it all. Unless you are there, hands on, you have no idea”. I know a way lot more than you assume.It ain’t history,it’s regurgitation.If you like it,go buy it.If it’s “ART” (sic) it’s open to different view points and opinions.That is the function of art.

  26. 26 Matt Olsen Jun 15th, 2013 at 4:18 pm

    Hi everybody
    I just wanted to chime in and say thanks for the kind words and constructive criticism from a few guys. Britt and I built the bike with the help of our friends for the main purpose if having fun with it through her racing it at a few events a year. The bike is definitely not cutting edge or revelutionary it is a ton if fun to ride and its amazing to see britt ride it around. If you’re going to born fre, wauseon or davenport please come by and say hi and hear it run.
    Have a great day
    Best
    Matt Olsen

  27. 27 Terence Tory Jun 17th, 2013 at 9:19 am

    Tory says:”It’s a fine bike nonetheless.” It’s an interesting process stimulating debate,and many skip the details,like short sharp praise in print.

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